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Fountain of Youth: Clean Air? January 22, 2009

Posted by Tom in Government policies, Interesting stories, Research, Studies, Uncategorized.
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Here’s a motivating reason to cut emissions and support environmental clean-up: less air pollution = longer life. Researchers have found that the presence of fine particulates in pollution can significantly reduce life expectancy about 5-10 months. Fine particulates are tiny particles that can be inhaled and potentially cause cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. They are caused by various sources like cigarettes, gasoline and diesel engines and power plants.

Bringham Young University Epidemiologist C. Arden Pope III and his team conducted studies comprising  of 51 metropolitan areas and concluded that every decrease of 10 micrograms per cubic meter of particulate pollution, the average life span in that city increased over seven months.

Similar studies have been done that have produced similar results. One challenge in getting people to make major change is being able to show the consequences of pollution in a tangible way. These studies are crucial because they show measurable results of pollution prevention and reduction, hopefully motivating the federal government, local governments, corporations and even individuals to regulate emissions and take measures to improve air quality. To learn more about the study, read this article from the Los Angeles Times.

Do these studies motivate you into changing your habits to reduce pollution?

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